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Ted Hall
 
October 25, 2009 | Cattle, Grass-fed Beef | Ted Hall

Fall Cattle Roundup: Part I

The beauty - and the madness - of our integrated farming operation is that we move seamlessly from one activity to another. Although we have just completed our grape (and potato) harvest, we held the fall roundup of our Shorthorn cattle herd on Thursday.

We pressed our last red wine on Wednesday afternoon, which means we have completed the initial fermentation of all of our wines. The 2009 red wines are already in the barrel in our cave and the grape crusher and press have been cleaned, sanitized, and stored not to be used again until next year.

But, on Thursday we were already off to our 500-acre property at Tomales Farm & Dairy to conduct our fall roundup of the Shorthorn cattle herd.  We brought in our entire herd of heritage breed Shorthorn mother cows (about 75) and their calves.  This is an important event as we examine every animal for its health status, take important steps to protect each animal against disease or nutrition problems, and remove the weakest animals from the herd.

We vaccinated every cow and calf and applied wormer to eliminate parasites, flies, and mites. We also placed two boluses (one selenium and one copper) in the first stomach of every animal to ensure proper mineral balance - because grasslands in Northern California are notoriously deficient of these critical micro-nutrients.  

Since early July the cows have been exposed to our three outstanding Shorthorn bulls. At the fall roundup we remove the bulls from the herd and check every cow for pregnancy.  Our vet, Dr. Nathan Keefer, palpates every animal ("the long reach of the arm") and gives us an estimate as to how far along the cow is in her preganancy.  We record this information and use it for monitoring the cows in the spring.  Our target calving date is April 15th (gestation is 284 days or 9 months and 10 days) and we want to know which cows might be early or late.  

If a cow is not pregnant, we evaluate her age, body condition, and bloodline to determine whether she should remain in our herd.  

At this roundup we decided to cull (or remove) 9 cows from our herd.  This reduction is offset by 11 new cows ("first calf heifers") that we added to the herd in July.

We also weaned the calves, which means we separated the calves from their mothers.  Our target is to wean the calves at about 200 days of age.  At this stage they are very strong and independent and we want their mothers to focus their energy on the next calf - since they are already pregnant and at the end of their first trimester.

After a long day of handling almost 140 animals, we returned to Long Meadow Ranch with the bulls (where they are maintained for the winter). We were pleased with health status of the herd and also with the progress we are making in creating a first-class grass-fed beef program. 

Next on our agenda, during the first week in November,  we will be holding our fall roundup of Highland cattle at our leases at Ferndale in Humboldt County.  

And then, of course, there is the olive harvest . . . in the meantime there is the planting of cover crops at LMR Rutherford Gardens, completing the winterizing ("erosion control") of all of our vineyards, and . . .

Posted by Ted Hall

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