THE BEET

Category: Year 2018


FROM THE FARM

March 2018

Full Circle FarmingWith five properties consisting of vineyards, olive groves, fruits and vegetables, cattle, horses, chickens, and bees, we take an approach called Full Circle Farming; an organic, sustainable, integrated farming system that relies on each part of the ranch to contribute to the health of the whole. Nearly every ingredient—from the grapes that go into our wines, to the beef used in our burger at the restaurant at Farmstead—is harvested......

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FROM THE FARM

February 2018

If you asked our agricultural team their thoughts on January and February, they’d say, “Is it March yet?!” The year started off with stormy weather and heavy rainfall, which is great news for our vines and farm but makes for cold and wet conditions around the ranch. While we are busy pruning the vineyard (removing last year’s growth from the dormant vines) it’s our livestock that’s buzzing with life around the......

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Resolution #1

Five Resolutions You Can Keep in 2018!

Fuel Your Soul This classic French omelet is brightened with somefresh garden herbs and a side of LMR house-smoked bacon.Enjoy with a glass of rosé, a bloody mary, or a mimosa with fresh squeezed orange juice.Recipe courtesy: Executive Chef, Stephen BarberServing Size: 1 omeletCLASSIC......

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Autumn 2017

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FROM THE VINEYARD

September 2017

Harvest kicked off at our Anderson Valley Estate at the end of August and was completed by September 18th (save for the late harvest Chardonnay which will be picked in the next few weeks). Cool nights in early summer, heatwaves (especially the one over labor day weekend), and hillside vineyards all played a part in making the 2017 harvest unique. We caught up with our director of agriculture and our Anderson Valley winemaker to get a......

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FROM THE FARM

AUGUST 2017

Napa Valley starts to get very busy in August as grape harvest sneaks up on us and is in full swing by September. But, before we tackle grape harvest, we are fortunate to experience a fruitful tomato season!This year we planted 14 tomato varietals, both heirlooms and hybrids, and they are all finally ripening with the heat we’ve had in Napa Valley the last few weeks. Here’s a little plant 101, in case......

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FROM THE VINEYARD

JULY 2017

At Long Meadow Ranch, we embrace history and quality over what’s trendy. However, it is imperative we are an economically viable company, otherwise we won’t remain a company for very long, right? After 25 years or so, a vineyard gets to the end of its usable life. Most growers remove these vineyards and replant new vines. In an effort to preserve the aging historic vines in our Bear Canyon cabernet sauvignon vineyard and......

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IN THE KITCHEN

June 2017

The Chef’s Table at Farmstead is an elegant communal dining experience hosted by our Estate Chef at the historic Logan Ives House. We begin the experience with a walk through our culinary gardens to show you what is growing on a much larger scale at our Rutherford Estate and give you a sneak peek into what you might find on your plate. The experience culminates at a shared table with our award winning wines......

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FROM THE FARM

MAY 2017

At Long Meadow Ranch, we take our fruits and veggies very seriously. Not only do we need our organic produce for our restaurant at Farmstead, but we use it to feed our chickens and sell it to our friends at the farmer’s market. We are transitioning from spring into summer and we’ve been planting like crazy the last couple weeks.We still have chard, kale, collards, lettuces, artichokes, and beets in the ground.......

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WHERE WE ARE

April 2017

Over the past several months, The Beet has highlighted our estates, taking you on a journey through the organically farmed vineyards and orchards. Today, we are showcasing Farmstead, our destination for food and wine in St Helena. Farmstead features a restaurant, café, general store, farmer’s market, and several dynamic event spaces, and is the property most visitors come to experience all that Long Meadow Ranch has to offer in one location. At our......

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WHERE WE ARE

February 2017

ANDERSON VALLEY ESTATE Our Anderson Valley Estate, in Mendocino County, stretches over a diverse mix of elevations with the Navarro River forming the southern boundary and cool sea breezes from the Pacific bringing the marine layer through our vines. Located in the west or “deep end” of the Anderson Valley, approximately 100 miles north of San Francisco, our estate has 69 acres planted to Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris. With the Navarro River to the southeast......

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WHERE WE ARE

January 2017

RUTHERFORD ESTATE Our Rutherford Estate sits on a mineral-rich benchland that was once a riverbed on the
floor of the Napa Valley and is now home to vineyards, fruits and vegetables,
beehives, and our flock of egg-laying chickens. There are 74 acres planted to Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Petit Verdot. With over 500 varietals of organic heirloom fruits and vegetables, our diverse ranch defies the
monoculture that reigns supreme in Napa Valley.......

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Who we are

December 2016

HISTORY In the late 1800’s, the original Long Meadow Ranch property thrived with vineyards, apple orchards, olive groves, hay, a goat milk dairy, and a long meadow (our namesake and the image below) until farming fell dormant during Prohibition. Over the following years, the property became swallowed by the encroaching forest until the Halls bought the property in 1989. Home to our Mayacamas Estate, the rugged 650-acre landscape nestled in the foothills of the
Mayacamas......

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FROM THE VINEYARD

November 2016

Winemaking 101 As 2016 harvest comes to an end, we thought it would be fun to take a look at
a grape's journey from crushpad to barrel. At our Mayacamas Estate, we receive grapes from our nearby vineyards within minutes of harvest.
The first step is to put the fruit through a destemmer. What we’re left with is fruit and stems.
The stems go into our compost to become fertilizer for the farm......

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FROM THE FARM

October 2016

Flashback to May when we planted our spuds in Tomales. You may recall, we planted 57 rows, each 750 feet long with a seed potato planted approximately every 12 inches, which we crossed our fingers would produce 6 potatoes per plant. Potatoes in Tomales are essentially dry farmed, because there is enough Spring soil moisture to germinate the potato and grow the crop without irrigation. Flash forward to last month: Let’s see how the tubers did! How do......

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FROM THE FARM

SEPTEMBER 2016

At Long Meadow Ranch, we believe honeybees are an integral part of a sustainable farm. Full circle farming utilizes all parts of the ranch to maintain the health of the whole. The crops at our Rutherford Estate are pollinated by the honeybees we have on property, plus we get to enjoy the honey these amazing creatures make. We have 10 colonies at our Rutherford Estate, each with three kinds of honeybees:
a queen, workers and......

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FROM THE GROVE

AUGUST 2016

HARVEST Long Meadow Ranch cultivates 16 acres of Picholine, Leccino, Frantoio, Manzanilla, Maurielo, and Pendolino olive trees. Our Prato Lungo olive trees were planted by the original owner of our Mayacamas Estate, EJ Church, in the late 1800s! We started our 2015 olive harvest in October and finished in early December. This was one of LMR’s best harvests to date with close to 40 tons of fruit. We pick approximately 70% black olives and 30% green olives, because the......

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FROM THE RANCH

JULY 2016

Once a year, our bulls leave their pasture at our Mayacamas Estate to visit Tomales Station. More importantly, the ladies. In order to grow our herd, the bulls spend three months with a group of mother cows and replacement heifers (remember, heifers become cows at the time of the birth of their second calf). We brought three bulls to Tomales Station, one for each pasture of mother cows or replacement heifers that we are breeding......

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FROM THE RANCH

JUNE 2016

In order for sheep to be healthy, they need to be sheared at least once a year. We shear our ewes twice annually (our lambs are not sheared). Since sheep cannot shed like other animals, excess wool can impede their ability to regulate body temperature and affect their hygiene, causing infections and endangering their health. Too much wool can also affect their ability to move quickly and avoid predators (we have coyotes in Tomales). Don......

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FROM THE RANCH

MAY 2016

At the beginning of May, we hit the fields at Tomales Station to plant Red La Soda and Yukon Gold potatoes. This land was first homesteaded by Irish settlers specifically for potatoes, because of the constant fog and moist ground. Taking notes from those before us, we plant our potatoes in the same location. We don't irrigate these potatoes, because they receive enough moisture from the ground. We planted 57 rows x 750 feet each = 8 miles of......

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ARTISAN OF THE MONTH

APRIL 2016

NAME Sal Godinez WHAT IS YOUR ROLE AT LONG MEADOW RANCH (LMR)? Mayacamas Estate Winemaker HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WITH LMR? 37 months WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PROJECT AT LMR? Cabernet Sauvignon winemaking WHAT DO YOU WISH OTHER PEOPLE KNEW ABOUT LMR? That LMR also produces varietal grappa and olive oil TELL US HOW YOU GOT INTO WINEMAKING. I was born in the small mountain town of Zamora outside of Michoacan, Mexico. When I......

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From the Ranch

March 2016

Originating in Scotland, Highland Cattle have long, shaggy hair and horns to withstand harsh elements year-round and March marks the beginning of their calving season. Our cows, heifers and calves live in Tomales at our 650 acre Tomales Station ranch.There are Marin Agricultural Land Trust (MALT) easements on a large portion of Tomales Station. We partnered with Point Blue Conservation Science’s Students & Teachers Restoring A Watershed program (STRAW), Marin Resource Conservation District (MRCD),......

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From the Vineyard

February 2016

Vineyard pruning is the practice of removing last year’s growth from the vines. We manipulate the vine to give us the fruit quality, quantity, and light environment we want for the growing season. Pruning is the most important vineyard operation all year, because it casts the die for the season’s upcoming crop. We prune to create balance between vine vigor and fruit load. Pruning takes place annually when our vines are “sleeping” (aka......

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From the Vineyard

January 2016

We've been busy since harvest!At the end of 2015 harvest, we removed an old Sauvignon Blanc block from our Rutherford Estate (the photo below is from the 2015 Sauvignon Blanc harvest).The first step in removing a vineyard is to pull out the posts (we donated ours to ranchers affected by the fire in Lake County to make necessary repairs from fire damage), remove the drip irrigation, any overhead sprinklers and the catch wires (we rolled......

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